This Is Why I Believe the Unix Philosophy Is Inherently Right

This is why I believe the Unix philosophy is inherently right: programs shouldn’t be vague, squishy things that grow in scope over time and are never really finished. A program should do one thing and do it well. If it becomes large and unwieldy, it’s refactored into pieces: libraries and scripts and compiled executables and data. Ambitious software projects shouldn’t be structured as all-or-nothing single programs, because every programming paradigm and toolset breaks down horribly on those. Instead, such projects should be structured as systems and given the respect typically given to such. This means that attention is paid to fault-tolerance, interchangeability of parts, and communication protocols. It requires more discipline than the haphazard sprawl of big-program development, but it’s worth it. In addition to the obvious advantages inherent in cleaner, more usable code, another benefit is that people actually read code, rather than hacking it as-needed and without understanding what they’re doing. This means that they get better as developers over time, and code quality gets better in the long run.

Micheal O' Church